Weight loss drug, lorcaserin found to solve opiate abuse

A recent research has found out that a weight loss drug given by prescription has the potential to reduce the urge to use opiates (anti-anxiety drugs) including oxycodone.

A recent research has found out that a weight loss drug given by prescription has the potential to reduce the urge to use opiates (anti-anxiety drugs) including oxycodone.

The weight loss drug that could potentially solve opiate abuse is lorcaserin according to the Galveston’s University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB).

In preclinical studies by the scientists, lorcaserin weight loss drug was found to have cut down the usage as well as craving for anti anxiety drugs like oxycodone.

Kathryn A. Cunningham of UTMB said: “The effectiveness of lorcaserin in reducing oxycodone seeking and craving highlights the therapeutic potential for lorcaserin in the treatment of opioid use disorder,” said Cunningham.

“We plan more studies to better understand how drugs like lorcaserin can help us stem the tide of addiction in America.”

anxious looking man
Anxiety representative image. Photo courtesy of David Castillo Dominici/Freedigitalphotos.net.

A majority of current treatments to decrease opiate are regarded as misusing work by taking over in place of the brain’s opiod receptors.

Taking opiate while undergoing these therapies would not make the person feel as strongly about the anti anxiety drug’s signature euphoria as per the researchers.

Having said that, the drug-taking environment of a person is a strong indication that can affect someone to anticipate the drug taking experience, a phenomenon called as cue reactivity.

People who have tried the presently available drugs quite frequently experience a relapse when they are amongst people, locations or paraphernalia that they relate with the use of opiate.

Prescribed by doctors for weight loss, lorcaserin modifies the serotonin system by altering chemical signals that impact satiety which is nothing but the sensation of fullness.

Especially by activating serotonin 2C receptors, serotonin controls the brain circuitry involved in drug reward and cue reactivity.

Originally posted 2017-03-26 16:36:31.

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